Published Articles, Various Authors
An Introduction to Backsticking, Pub. 1961
Saturday, January 26, 2013
posted by John Downlan
I have frequently been waylaid by drummers who want to be taught a few 'licks' or learn the finer points of Back Sticking.  Finally, after being urged by many percussionists, educators and others who saw the need for a publication of this kind, I have decided to put some of these ideas into print.
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How to Hold Drumsticks, Pub. 1977
Saturday, January 26, 2013
posted by Willis M. Rapp
Over the past few years, many percussion technicians have tried to teach students the exact way in which to hold sticks.  Today, it is more common to teach not the correct way, but rather the several acceptable ways of holding the sticks.  The choice is largely determined by the physical makeup of the hands.  Surely a person with short, stubby fingers will not hold the sticks in the same manner as a person with long, thin fingers.  Yet both can be considered to have correct hand positions.  The following statements should serve as a general guide to good hand position.
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Rudimentally Yours
Saturday, January 26, 2013
posted by Mitch Markovich
An impossible solo?

Several readers who have tried to play the backsticking solo that appeared in one of my articles a few issues ago, have written claiming that it is impossible to play the solo at the intended tempo.  It might be pointed out that these readers are not beginners, but experienced drummers.  The solo in question can be found in the Fall 1965 Volume #5 Number 2 issue of the Ludwig Drummer on page 19.  For those of you who may be unable to secure a copy of that issue, the selection in question is printed below.
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Stick Positioning for Better Control
Saturday, January 26, 2013
posted by Mitch Markovich
How do you develop speed?  What can I do to get better control?  I practice over an hour every day, and I still can't get anywhere.  Statements and questions like these are typical of the problems that confront the average drummer.  Although there are many approaches that can partially solve these problems, "positioning" is probably one of the most neglected.
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Dan English Trophy Winners
Saturday, January 26, 2013
posted by Unknown
Connecticut rudimental snare drummers are among the finest practitioners of the "art of drumming" in the world and one of the reasons, in addition to a great deal of talent and some very fine instructions like the late J. Burns Moore and Earl Sturtz, may have been their individual question for one of the most coveted prizes in all of drum corps - the Dan English trophy, awarded by Lancraft Fife & Drum Corps for individual snare drumming in the senior class as the Connecticut State Convention - the annual state championship standstill drum corps contest - held in August of every year for more than 100 years.
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Origin of NARD
Saturday, January 26, 2013
For those who are not familiar with the National Association of Rudimental Drummers, here is a brief history of this organization.  The Association was organized during the American Legion National Convention in 1933 by a group of prominent drummers, pictured on this page, who selected thirteen of the Standard American Drum Rudiments required for membership in this organization.
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The Development of Drum Rudiments
Tuesday, January 08, 2013
posted by W. F. Ludwig
For many years there has been a great deal of discussion among drummers, music educators, conductors and composers regarding the value of DRUM RUDIMENTS; how they came into being and their place in today's music.  I would like to trace their development and discuss their purpose and value.
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